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“Civil Death” of Frances Ono: Part 3

When Frances Ono’s daughter Susan Husted petitioned Contra Costa County Court for conservatorship over Frances, there was an expectation of due process in the proceedings.  There was an expectation that Judge John H. Sugiyama would follow California’s Bill of Rights and California’s Probate Code.

Judge Sugiyama is Chair of the Probate and Mental Health Advisory Committee for the California Judicial Council.  Judge Sugiyama would be particularly familiar with Probate Code.  He is also in a position to guide actions of probate courts throughout California.

Sadly, Frances did not receive the benefit of California’s Bill of Rights or California’s Probate Code in Judge Sugiyama’s court.

“Civil Death” of Frances Ono: Part 2

Frances Ono’s ordeal with Contra Costa County Probate Court ensued from daughter Susan Husted’s efforts to isolate Frances and deny her right to change her estate plan.  With no due process, Judge John H. Sugiyama granted Susan conservatorship over Frances’ person and estate.  Susan gained complete control over Frances’ finances and personal life.

Court records show a shocking lack of due process in Judge Sugiyama’s court.  Judge Sugiyama disregarded numerous Probate Codes.  He denied Frances her right to object.  He imposed conservatorship with no evidence and no testimony.  Judge Sugiyama went beyond conservatorship  and stripped Frances of rights that California law guarantees to residents in assisted living.

Of even greater concern is Judge Sugiyama’s role as Chair of the Probate and Mental Health Advisory Committee for the California Judicial Council.  Judge Sugiyama is in a position to drive similar practices in courts throughout California.

“Civil Death” of Frances Ono: Part 1

Frances Ono (93) was twice stripped of her civil rights.  During World War II, Frances and her family were incarcerated in prison camps authorized by President Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066.  There was no due process of law for Japanese Americans forcibly removed from their homes.

Seventy-five years later, Frances is again imprisoned and denied basic civil rights.  Contra Costa County Probate Court placed Frances under conservatorship, a fate that many advocates call civil death.  Court records show extensive violations of due process.